Homeschooling With The Math Translator

During my 20+ years as a math educator, I have had the opportunity to teach at grade levels from middle school to college, with the community college level being my primary focus.  I work almost exclusively with courses designed for non-math majors and my expertise is in preparing students who arrive at college underprepared for math at the college level.  I am confident that my service can prepare your child to enter college with their math placement scores at the college level.

Why should I homeschool with The Math Translator?

The most common platforms for online instruction these days are Learning Management Systems (LMS). A LMS is a software program that provides online homework and walks students through homework problems if they struggle with a problem.  These platforms are good in theory, but from my years of teaching in the online format I have learned that LMS programs don't actually translate into success for the student. I have found two main issues with the LMS programs that decrease their efficacy. 

The first problem is that LMS programs generally do not provide comprehensive instruction.   If they provide videos, they are generally short "snippet" videos. Snippet videos do not provide enough background for a student to fully comprehend the concepts.  There is a reason that class periods are an hour long! The second issue I have found with LMS programs is that the act of doing homework on a computer is fundamentally different than doing homework on paper.  There is something about writing on paper that is crucial for the process of learning mathematics.  

The Math Translator provides a high-quality alternative to LMS programs

A few years ago I removed all of my online classes from LMS programs and instead recreated the face to face environment in the online setting and my success rates soared!  The traditional method of learning mathematics really is the best format for learning the subject.  That format involves comprehensive instruction from a qualified instructor, the student actively participating in the instruction by taking notes, the student applying what they learn by doing homework by hand with a pencil and paper out of a book and not on a computer program, and then assessments that test what the student has learned.  The Math Translator service is structured to provide all of these elements in a straight forward and user friendly model that provides a much needed alternative to the LMS programs currently available on the market.

How can I use The Math Translator program to homeschool my child in math?

The Math Translator program is best used as a direct replacement for the instruction received at a brick and mortar school.  Take a few moments to listen to Melissa speak about how The Math Translator program works.

  • Step 1

    Students watch the video lessons and take notes as they would if they were in class in person.

  • Step 2

    Students do the suggested homework exercises listed on each lesson page. The homework is done out of the free online OpenStax™ math textbooks. Students can check their answers on the homework problems in the OpenStax book and if they have questions they can reference the homework support videos posted on each lesson page.

  • Step 3

    At the end of each chapter, students study for the test and take the Practice Test provided in the OpenStax textbook.  Students, or parents, can then grade the test using the "Practice Test Answer Keys" posted on the homepage of the video library.

Which Courses are Recommended for my Child at Each Grade Level?

Below you will find suggestions for which course corresponds to which grade level.  These suggestions are based on the standard curriculums seen in brick and mortar schools as well as my assessment of what will best prepare students to enter college at the college level.  Because homeschool families have a large variation in needs and schedules, these are just guidelines.  It is recommended that you work with your schedule, your child's interest level in mathematics, and their grade level to determine which course is right for your child at any given time.  For more details on these courses, please see the Courses page.

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    Prealgebra - Recommended for grade 7 (approximately 12 years old)

    This course will be ready for enrollment beginning Fall 2020

    This course covers the fundamental arithmetic and geometry skills needed for success in algebra.  Topics include whole numbers, the language of algebra, integers, fractions, decimals, percents, the properties of real numbers, solving linear equations, math models and geometry, polynomials, and graphs. 

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    Elementary Algebra - Recommended for grade 8 (approximately 13-14 years old)

    This course will be ready for enrollment beginning Fall 2020

    This course covers the fundamental concepts of algebra.  Topics include solving linear equations and inequalities, math models, linear graphs, systems of linear equations, polynomials, factoring, rational expressions and equations, roots and radicals, and quadratic equations.

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    Intermediate Algebra - Recommended for grades 9 and 10 (approximately 14-16 years old)

    This course is complete and available for enrollment at any time

    This course covers algebra concepts in the depth needed to prepare students for college algebra.  Topics include solving linear equations, graphs and functions, systems of linear equations, polynomials and polynomial functions, factoring, rational expressions and functions, roots and radicals, quadratic equations and functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, conic sections, and series, sequences, and the binomial theorem.

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    College Algebra - Recommended for grades 11 and 12 for students not planning on majoring in math or science (approximately 16-18 years old)

    This course will be ready for enrollment beginning Fall 2021

    This course provides a comprehensive exploration of algebra principles. Topics include equations and inequalities, functions, linear functions, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, systems of equations and inequalities, analytic geometry, sequences, probability, and counting theory.

  • Book Cover for Algebra and Trigonometry based on the Open Stax curriculum

    Algebra and Trigonometry - Recommended for grades 11 and 12 for students that are uncertain of whether they will major in math or science (approximately 16-18 years old)

    This course will be ready for enrollment beginning Fall 2021

    This course provides in depth coverage of algebra and trigonometry principles. Topics include equations and inequalities, functions, linear functions, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, the unit circle, periodic functions, trigonometric identities and equations, further applications of trigonometry, systems of equations and inequalities, analytic geometry, sequences, probability, and counting theory.

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    Precalculus - Recommended for grades 11 and 12 for students that are certain they will major in math or science (approximately 16-18 years old)

    This course will be ready for enrollment beginning Fall 2021

    This course covers the algebra and trigonometry principles needed for success in calculus. Topics include functions, linear functions, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, periodic functions, trigonometric identities and equations, further applications of trigonometry, systems of equations and inequalities, analytic geometry, sequences, probability, and counting theory, and an introduction to calculus.

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    Statistics - Recommended for grades 11 and 12 as an alternative or in addition to the College Algebra course (approximately 16 - 18 years old)

    This course will be ready for enrollment beginning Spring 2022

    This course provides an introduction to statistics geared towards students majoring in fields other than math and engineering.  Topics include sampling and data, descriptive statistics, probability topics, discrete random variables, continuous random variables, the normal distribution, the central limit theorem, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing with one sample, hypothesis testing with two samples, the chi-square distribution, linear regression and correlation, and F distribution and one-way ANOVA.

Learn to Speak Math

Video lectures and homework support for the OpenStax™ math books